Showing posts with category "college basketball"

Season Ticket Prices and Minimum Donations at FBS Schools

Rivals has collected football season ticket prices and minimum donations at the 120 FBS schools for the 2010 season.  The donations work like NFL personal seat licenses.  Programs realize there is "money on the table" since some fans place a higher value on attendance at home games than what it costs to get season tickets.  So schools charge a fee to capture some of that value in order to generate maximum revenue. There's not a lot of surprising things in there, at least to this economist.  Ohio State tops the list with a minimum donation of $1,500 - you could […]

May 12, 2020
tags
college football

The Economic Impact of the Demise of the Big XII - Waco

A Waco economist, RayPerryman, has prepared an economic impact statement about the impact of the demise of the Big XII on Waco and Texas (via a commenter to another TSE post, Millsy): The report Perryman shared Thursday includes an estimated $714 million loss in annual expenditures in the state of Texas. Waco’s potential hit could reach $196.7 million annually. Those losses include tourism — money spent at restaurants, hotels, stores, gas stations, etc. — television revenue and other areas, he said. Additionally, Perryman projects the loss of 5,764 jobs statewide and 1,677 in the Waco area if Baylor is not […]

May 12, 2020
tags
Big 12

The Wooden School of Management

As a young sports fan, I came of age watching but not liking UCLA basketball in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  They were Goliath and I pulled for the variety of Davids facing them.  As I grew into a sports economist, long after John Wooden's retirement, my respect for Wooden's methods as a coach grew as his firm but low-key style stood miles apart from the growing hordes of  maniacal figures stomping around college sidelines.   As I researched books, interviews, and articles about a variety of successful managers and coaches for my 2005 book, From the Ballfield to […]

May 12, 2020
tags
college basketball

World Cup Betting

In a few days the world's biggest sporting event, the World Cup, will begin in South Africa.  In addition to being an immensely popular spectator sporting event, the World Cup is also a very popular gambling event.  The Wall Street Journal speculates that the 2010 World Cup will be the largest betting event in history and reports that between one and  three billion pounds sterling could be wagered in the UK alone.  Since much of the World Cup betting involves office pools and informal bets among individuals, it is impossible to estimate the actual amount of money wagered, but it […]

May 12, 2020
tags
gambling

More News From Dallas

The Dallas Morning News is examining the gap between the estimated economic impact of the NBA All Star Game and the actual revenues reported by hotels, restaurants, and rental car agencies.  The story follows up on similar comparisons made by TV reporter Byron Harris, and in addition offers Michael Casinelli, the consultant behind the original report, an opportunity to stick a foot in his mouth. Here's what Casinelli has to say on the gap between his estimates and the reported figures: "What I'm hearing [from critics] is you have to be absolutely 100 percent accurate on a future prediction when nothing is […]

May 12, 2020
tags
economic impact

March Madness: O Canada Version

The second round game between Syracuse and Gonzaga today has an interesting sub-plot:  a lot of Canadians will be on the floor.  Syracuse guard Andy Rautins and forward Kris Joseph are Canadian citizens; Gonzaga has four Canadians on the roster.  In Canada, sports channel The Score has the broadcast rights to the Big Dance, and they have naturally been promoting teams with Canadian players heavily. They also do a lot of old school, ESPN-style switching between games to show close finishes. Dave Berri and a slew of coauthors have investigated the effect of the globalization of sport on competitive balance […]

May 12, 2020
tags
college basketball

More Big 10 Expansion Talk - Does Basketball Matter?

Following up on Brad's post about Big 10 expansion plans, it looks like the football coaches in the Big XII have no idea what's going on in Expando World.  At the least, they're not tipping their hands.  From Dave Matter at the Columbia Daily Tribune: Conference realignment is the biggest offseason plot line in college football. Coaches in the Big 12 are as curious as everyone else following the headlines — and fumbling in the dark for answers. Matter goes on to mention some of the candidates being bandied about, including everybody's favorite Notre Dame plus one that I mentioned […]

May 12, 2020
tags
Big 12

Sweet Lew's Sweet Compensation Package

Major college athletic programs are run in ways that are very similar their professional brethren. They compete in markets for top talent (except that in college, the players can't be paid). They practice price discrimination. For example, colleges routinely give ticket discounts to students, an example of what we economists call third-degree price discrimination. They use two-part tariffs to allocate tickets. In the pros, they use personal seat licenses. In college, they use donations. Both the pros and the colleges employ revenue sharing. The primary difference between the colleges and the pros is that the revenue programs in college, generally […]

May 12, 2020
tags
NCAA; college sports

NCAA Men's Basketball Postseason Roundup

March Madness is upon us again.  This year, the men's college basketball postseason features some interesting economic madness across the board.  For the second year in a row, there are four postseason tournaments. Here's a roundup of the four events: The NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship. The "Big Dance."  65 teams in a single elimination "knockout" tournament spread over three weekends in March and April.  Games are held at predetermined neutral sites across the country.  The big economic news here is that this could be the last year of the much-loved 65 team format, which has been in place […]

May 12, 2020
tags
college basketball

Why Are Economic Models so Complex?

We sports economists have become accustomed to inflated economic impact statements made in documents used to support subsidies for sports. Economists Craig Depken and J. C. Bradbury have recent posts on their blogs about this issue. First, in a post over at Division of Labour, Craig posts an excerpt from a Miami Herald article on the economic impact of Super Bowls in Miami. Advocates of the Super Bowl as an economic engine dismiss its academic skeptics as using complicated formulas to obscure the obvious. And they note that the reports bashing NFL figures bring the professors coveted media coverage as […]

May 12, 2020
tags
economic impact

Will the Big 10 Raid the Big XII? An Exercise in Club Theory

Sports leagues can be thought of as clubs. To enter any club, permission must be obtained from the incumbents, which means a sufficient number of them must be made better off by the entrant. Similarly, the entrant has to be made better off by joining the club. If it is mutually-beneficial, we'll see entry into the club. You probably are aware that the Big 10 has become serious about adding a 12th member. Former Wisconsin football coach and current AD Barry Alvarez and the legendary Joe Paterno of Penn State have both gone on the record saying that the Big […]

May 12, 2020
tags
expansion

No Country for Old Men: The Bowden Saga

Due to travels, I missed writing about the Bobby Bowden affair during the height of the storm. The dismay among FSU fans is strong. In an Orlando Sentinel blog poll, 42% thought it time for Bowden to go -- although a minority and not necessarily a good indicator of the precise number of such fans, it is still a fairly strong signal of the uneasiness with the situation. The topic of age and coaching performance fits into the realm of an article by my former colleague, Tom Wisley and myself, on Is There a Managerial Life Cycle?. Using NFL data […]

May 12, 2020
tags
bowden